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Run a query

The /query resource lets you stream the output records of a SELECT statement via a chunked transfer encoding. The response is streamed back until the LIMIT specified in the statement is reached, or the client closes the connection. If no LIMIT is specified in the statement, then the response is streamed until the client closes the connection.

POST /query

Run a SELECT statement and stream back the results.

JSON Parameters:

  • ksql (string): The SELECT statement to run.
  • streamsProperties (map): Property overrides to run the statements with. Refer to the Config Reference for details on properties that you can set.
  • streamsProperties[property-name] (string): The value of the property named by property-name. Both the value and property-name should be strings.

Each response chunk is a JSON object with the following format:

Response JSON Object:

  • header (object): Information about the result. - header.queryId: (string): the unique id of the query. This can be useful when debugging. For example, when looking in the logs or processing log for errors or issues. - header.schema: (string): the list of columns being returned. This defines the schema for the data returned later in row.columns.
  • row (object): A single row being returned. This will be null if an error is being returned. - row.columns (array): The values of the columns requested. The schema of the columns was already supplied in header.schema. - row.tombstone (boolean): Whether the row is a deletion of a previous row. It is recommended that you include all columns within the primary key in the projection so that you can determine which previous row was deleted.
  • finalMessage (string): If this field is non-null, it contains a final message from the server. This signifies successful completion of the query.
    No additional rows will be returned and the server will end the response.
  • errorMessage (string): If this field is non-null, an error has been encountered while running the statement. This signifies unsuccessful completion of the query. No additional rows are returned and the server will end the response.

Examples

Example curl command

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curl -X "POST" "http://<ksqldb-host-name>:8088/query" \
     -H "Accept: application/vnd.ksql.v1+json" \
     -d $'{
  "ksql": "SELECT * FROM USERS EMIT CHANGES;",
  "streamsProperties": {}
}'

Example request

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POST /query HTTP/1.1
Accept: application/vnd.ksql.v1+json
Content-Type: application/vnd.ksql.v1+json

{
  "ksql": "SELECT * FROM pageviews EMIT CHANGES;",
  "streamsProperties": {
    "ksql.streams.auto.offset.reset": "earliest"
  }
}

Example stream response

If the query result is a stream, the response will not include the row.tombstone field, as streams don't have primary keys or the concept of a deletion.

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HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/vnd.ksql.v1+json
Transfer-Encoding: chunked

...
{"header":{"queryId":"_confluent_id_19",schema":"`ROWTIME` BIGINT, `NAME` STRING, `AGE` INT"}}
{"row":{"columns":[1524760769983,"1",1524760769747,"alice","home"]}}
...

Example table response

If the query result is a table, the response may include deleted rows, as identified by the row.tombstone field.

Rows within the table are identified by their primary key. Rows may be inserted, updated or deleted. Rows without the tombstone field set indicate an upserts, (inserts or updates). Rows with the tombstone field set indicate a delete.

While it is not a requirement to include the primary key columns within the query's projection, any use-case that is attempting to materialize the table, or has a requirement to be able to correlate later updates and deletes to previous rows, will generally need all primary key columns in the projection.

In the example response below, the ID column is the primary key of the table. The second row in the response deletes the first.

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HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/vnd.ksql.v1+json
Transfer-Encoding: chunked

...
{"header":{"queryId":"_confluent_id_34",schema":"`ROWTIME` BIGINT, `NAME` STRING, `ID` INT"}}
{"row":{"columns":[1524760769983,"alice",10]}},
{"row":{"columns":[null,null,10],"tombstone":true}}
...

Last update: 2021-02-09